Outpatient Surgery Magazine

Special Outpatient Surgery Edition - Surgical Construction - March 2018

Outpatient Surgery Magazine, providing current information on Surgical Services, Surgical Facility Administration, Outpatient Surgery News and Trends, OR Excellence and more.

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monitors from the ceiling, you'll have to place them on audio- visual carts. The oxygen, nitrous and suction hanging from the ceiling could also interfere with GI cases. Equip each room with 2 monitors — one for the doctor and one for the nurse/technician assisting the physician in handling the scope, biopsy forceps and snare. Unlike most ORs, GI rooms routinely have a small sink as part of the cabinetry. You'll need an in-room cabinet (glass door or stainless steel) to store your supplies, such as towels, suction, 4x4s, K-Y Jelly, IVs, IV tubing, medications and specimen containers. 5. Create a comfortable space. Yes, you want to provide patients with a pleasant setting, but don't skimp on what I call "non- revenue-generating spaces," such as lockers and break rooms for staff. And don't forget about the people who drove your patients and are taking a few hours out of their day. Invest in comfortable waiting room chairs for patient escorts. In one center, I put sofas with pillows in the waiting room. The doctors didn't much care for it, but the escorts were comfortable. The chairs in one center were so uncom- fortable that escorts routinely went next door to another doctor's office to sit on chairs with padded arms. M A R C H 2 0 1 8 • O U T PA T I E N T S U R G E R Y. N E T • 6 1 • REPROCESSING BLUES A scenario you should avoid at all costs — the patient is ready, the doctor is ready … but the scope isn't.

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