Outpatient Surgery Magazine - Subscribers

Surgical Smoke Nearly Killed Me - Outpatient Surgery Magazine - February 2018

Outpatient Surgery Magazine, providing current information on Surgical Services, Surgical Facility Administration, Outpatient Surgery News and Trends, OR Excellence and more.

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Add-On Cases: Friend or Foe? You should always make room for one more case. I f you get annoyed every time a surgeon wants to add a case to his already over- booked block, you're not alone. Add-ons can be incredibly incon- venient and disrup- tive, especially when they're cases that the surgeon's scheduler forgot to tell you about — not truly emergent ones like ruptured globes, detached retinas, testicular torsions and kidney stones. But rather than abhor them, we adore add-ons at our 2 independent surgery centers in Richmond, Va. On the one hand, we get paid for performing surgeries, not for standing around. On the other, you can't put a price on the goodwill you'll bank with your surgeons — and your patients — when you accommodate them by gladly accepting add-ons (urgent and non-emergent). Maybe you'll view add-ons in a different light after reading our perspective. Our duty and obligation First and foremost, we see add-on cases as part of our commitment to surgeons and patients to provide surgical care when the need is criti- cal, not just when it's convenient. 2 8 • O U T PA T I E N T S U R G E R Y M A G A Z I N E • F E B R U A R U Y 2 0 1 8 Business Advisor Bruce P. Kupper, MHA, FACHE • MORE THE MERRIER You might not see it this way, but it's clearly to your advantage to accommodate non-urgent cases when they arise.

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