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A Drug Diverter Comes Clean - Subscribe to Outpatient Surgery Magazine - December 2017

Outpatient Surgery Magazine, providing current information on Surgical Services, Surgical Facility Administration, Outpatient Surgery News and Trends, OR Excellence and more.

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Are Your Surgeons Suffering in Silence? The wear and tear of laparoscopy will take its toll on your doctors. D o you think much about the physical toll surgeons experi- ence as a result of their jobs, about the wear and tear on their bodies from laparoscopy? We didn't either until we talked to several surgeons about repeti- tive stress injuries and OR ergonomics for "The Aches and Pains of Laparoscopy" on page 62 of this issue. We had no idea laparoscopy was such a grueling and physically demanding activity that took such a toll on surgeons' bodies. But operating chopstick-style with your neck, shoulders, arms, wrists and hands at odd angles and stuck in one position for hours put enormous stress and strain on the body. "Ergonomics may be the most important issue facing surgeons today," says Howard Ross, MD, chief of colon and rectal surgery at Temple University Hospital in Philadelphia, Pa. "This is an underappreciated and an incredibly important topic." Even though your surgeons might limp out of the OR after a day of laparoscopy feeling like a giant bruise, you might not hear them com- plain. Their machismo and their training won't let them. "We're used to suffering," they say to themselves. "Medical school conditioned us to work hard." 1 0 • O U T PA T I E N T S U R G E R Y M A G A Z I N E • D E C E M B E R 2 0 1 7 Editor's Page Dan O'Connor ERGONOMICS Laparoscopy takes a real toll on surgeons' bodies.

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