Outpatient Surgery Magazine

A Drug Diverter Comes Clean - Subscribe to Outpatient Surgery Magazine - December 2017

Outpatient Surgery Magazine, providing current information on Surgical Services, Surgical Facility Administration, Outpatient Surgery News and Trends, OR Excellence and more.

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1 0 2 • O U T PA T I E N T S U R G E R Y M A G A Z I N E • D E C E M B E R 2 0 1 7 Y ou apply warm cot- ton blankets and actively warm patients before, dur- ing and after surgery without a second thought to main- taining normothermia. But there's more than you might think that goes into keeping patients' core body temperatures above 36°C. Here are a 6 things you might not know about hypothermia preven- tion. 1. FDA did not endorse forced air Fearful that hospitals and surgical centers would stop warming patients altogether over concerns about the safety of forced-air warm- ing (FAW), the FDA sent healthcare providers a letter (osmag.net/ 4ezKYS) in August reiterating the importance of actively warming sur- gical patients with "thermoregulation devices." Because the letter mentions forced air by name, it was easy to misinterpret the letter as an FDA endorsement of FAW. "The FDA continues to recommend the use of thermoregulating devices (including forced air thermal regulat- ing systems) for surgical procedures when clinically warranted," reads the letter. 6 Things You Might Not Know About Patient Warming A look at the not-so-obvious details of hypothermia prevention. • PRE-OP WARMING If the patient starts off surgery with a higher core temperature, it might not drop as low during induction. Pamela Bevelhymer, RN, BSN, CNOR Brielle Gregory | Associate Editor

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