Outpatient Surgery Magazine

Special Outpatient Surgery Edition - Staff & Patient Safety - October 2017

Outpatient Surgery Magazine, providing current information on Surgical Services, Surgical Facility Administration, Outpatient Surgery News and Trends, OR Excellence and more.

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O C T O B E R 2 0 1 7 O U T P A T I E N T S U R G E R Y . N E T 5 3 D ouble- gloving limits the like- lihood that sharps will breach both layers and break skin, and wearing differ- ent-colored gloves makes it easier to notice when the outer layer has been pierced. But some sur- geons still refuse to double down on reducing the risk of cross-contamination. You've likely heard some or all of these objections from docs who prefer to work with a single, thin layer between themselves and patients: • "Double-gloving is a waste of time, money and resources." • "It's more important and cost-effective to teach providers and staff how to safely pass, dispose of and clean sharp instruments." • "Why should we double-glove? Show me evidence that it reduces infection risks." If you've run up against the counter-arguments, you know that resistance is most likely to center on 3 primary concerns: sensitivity, dexterity and comfort. Experts agree that some disciplines — those that demand extraordinary tactile sensitivity, such as ophthalmology and neurology — may warrant exceptions to recommended double-gloving policies. But organizations such as the American Two Gloves Are Better Than One Double-gloving can be a hard sell, but there are plenty of reasons to make it mandatory. Jim Burger | Senior Editor GLOVE STORY Studies suggest that double-gloving can improve safety without impeding dexterity or fine motor skills. Pamela Bevelhymer, RN, BSN, CNOR

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