Outpatient Surgery Magazine - Subscribers

The Economics of Prefilled Syringes - August 2017 - Outpatient Surgery Magazine

Outpatient Surgery Magazine, providing current information on Surgical Services, Surgical Facility Administration, Outpatient Surgery News and Trends, OR Excellence and more.

Issue link: http://magazine.outpatientsurgery.net/i/860206

Contents of this Issue

Navigation

Page 34 of 116

Facebook account of a picture of an anesthesia monitor displaying a patient's vitals — "Just sittin here watching the tube on Christmas morning. Ho ho ho," reads the caption — Dr. Spillers admitted to sometimes texting and reading his iPad during procedures. The patient, 61-year-old Roseann Milne, had undergone an AV node abla- tion, a relatively routine heart procedure. She died 10 hours later. Lesson learned. Social media distractions in the OR are bad and must always be prohibited, right? Maybe not so fast. Let's consider a couple of points. One is that non-patient-related activities in the OR are nothing new. Some define anesthesia as 99% boredom, 1% sheer terror. Anesthesia professionals have been read- ing, doing crossword puzzles and playing Sudoku in the OR for decades, without creating any obvious pattern of negative outcomes. More to the point, can we assume that any distraction during any part of any case is always a bad thing? A 2013 MIT study (osmag.net/dawx9u) concluded that military drone operators, who are often fighter pilots, actually tend to be more effective if they're distracted from time to time. They spend the vast majority of their time waiting for something to happen, watching video screens while drones hover over targets. The study found that occasional distractions help alleviate their boredom, which keeps them sharper and more alert when they need to jump into action — when, for example, a hostile target appears. Anesthesia providers don't fly drones, but they have something in common with pilots. For both, "takeoff" and "landing" are virtually always the most stressful and demanding times. And in between, there's usually relatively little action. Sterile cockpit rule A U G U S T 2 0 1 7 • O U T PA T I E N TS U R G E R Y. N E T • 3 5

Articles in this issue

Links on this page

Archives of this issue

view archives of Outpatient Surgery Magazine - Subscribers - The Economics of Prefilled Syringes - August 2017 - Outpatient Surgery Magazine