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The Economics of Prefilled Syringes - August 2017 - Outpatient Surgery Magazine

Outpatient Surgery Magazine, providing current information on Surgical Services, Surgical Facility Administration, Outpatient Surgery News and Trends, OR Excellence and more.

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the laboratory. "The ultimate goal is to move away from the need for trans- plants, so we know exactly what we're putting into patients and can virtually eliminate any possibility of inadvertently transmit- ting disease," says Dr. Lewis. Researchers are getting closer. The ability to identify microscopic species has dramatically improved over the last decade, thanks to modern sequencing technology that can identify species based on their DNA, instead of having to culture them. "But there are undoubt- edly bacteria we haven't yet identified," says Dr. Lewis, "and those could be a concern." Despite the unknowns, Dr. Lewis strongly believes that there are patients for whom fecal microbiota transplantation is appropriate treatment, especially when one considers the potentially devastat- ing consequences of C. diff infections. And he encourages patients and providers to participate in one or more of the registries that are collecting long-term data, such as the American Gastroenter-ologi- cal Association FMT Registry (osmag.net/go4wje), to understand what, if any, long-term impact transplants may have. OSM A U G U S T 2 0 1 7 • O U T PA T I E N TS U R G E R Y. N E T • 1 1 1 Administering a targeted and relatively small amount of narrow- spectrum antibiotics is safer than carpet-bombing with an arse- nal of broad-spectrum drugs. Unless you're dealing with a known infection, narrow-spectrum antibiotics geared toward the specific bacteria associated with particular areas of the body are usually enough to decrease the risk of infection. • Be wary of post-op administration. There's very little data to suggest that post-operative antibiotics are needed in most cases. It's when the incision is happening that antibiotics really need to be present. — Jim Burger

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