Outpatient Surgery Magazine

Hip With the Times - July 2017 - Subscribe to Outpatient Surgery Magazine

Outpatient Surgery Magazine, providing current information on Surgical Services, Surgical Facility Administration, Outpatient Surgery News and Trends, OR Excellence and more.

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Can You Spot a Drug Diverter in Your Midst? Anesthesia providers are vulnerable to on-the-job opioid abuse. A ll the troublesome ingredients that can lead to drug diversion are intensified in anesthesia providers. They work in high- stress environments, they may suffer professional burnout and they have much easier access to opioids than most. They may also be prone to the false beliefs that they can stop any time, and that their knowledge and education will keep them from becoming addicted. Diverters may steal drugs for themselves, for money, or for a friend who's addicted or in pain (see "Detecting Diverters: Signs Are Plentiful"). Regardless, if we choose to look the other way, we enable them. It can be tempting to do so. We sympa- thize with their stress. Or we don't want to subject colleagues to pro- fessional or legal sanctions. We may even fear reprisal. Or we might just find it difficult to accept that a respected longtime coworker could do such a thing. So we make excuses. We give them lighter assignments to help alleviate stress. Or we complain to each other about suspected diverters, but don't take our concerns to the proper level. After all, what if I'm wrong? 3 2 • O U T PA T I E N T S U R G E R Y M A G A Z I N E • J U L Y 2 0 1 7 Anesthesia Alert Perry V. Ruspantine, CRNA, APRN • WHO AM I HURTING? Drug diversion should never be thought of as a victimless crime.

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