Outpatient Surgery Magazine

Special Outpatient Surgery Edition - Infection Control - May 2017

Outpatient Surgery Magazine, providing current information on Surgical Services, Surgical Facility Administration, Outpatient Surgery News and Trends, OR Excellence and more.

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M A Y 2 0 1 7 O U T P A T I E N TS U R G E R Y. N E T 6 1 What's the best way to make bundles work? If you try to make too much change too quickly, your staff will push back and lose interest. Zero in on making 3 to 4 elements of a bundle work. Additional steps can be added later after you hardwire those initial changes into practice and build off their successes. You also have to keep staff and surgeons engaged. I meet with surgeons quarterly and the OR staff biannually to present infection data and to talk about what we're going to tackle next. Everyone must feel like they're constantly involved in the process improvement. AORN and the American College of Surgeons recently argued about skullcaps increasing infection risks. What do you wear? I've worn both: whatever a facility provides. It was a power grab by both sides and didn't have anything to do with hard data. What you wear on your head real- ly doesn't make that much of a difference in infection rates, unless, of course, you have a lot of hair sticking out from under the cap and falling into the surgi- cal wound. I'd be thrilled if I had that much hair to cover. OSM Dr. Buhs (chad.buhs@mayo.edu) is a general surgeon affiliated with the Mayo Clinic Health System in Mankato, Minn.

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