Outpatient Surgery Magazine

Queasy Feeling - April 2017 - Subscribe to Outpatient Surgery Magazine

Outpatient Surgery Magazine, providing current information on Surgical Services, Surgical Facility Administration, Outpatient Surgery News and Trends, OR Excellence and more.

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1 2 • O U T PA T I E N T S U R G E R Y M A G A Z I N E • A P R I L 2 0 1 7 Ideas Work P r a c t i c a l p e a r l s f r o m y o u r c o l l e a g u e s That T emperature rise is one of the early signs of malignant hyperther- mia. In outpatient set- tings, there's a tenden- cy to think you can monitor the patient's temperature once in a while and be fine, but we know from past MH cases that temper- atures can rise very quickly within 30 min- utes of induction. The temperature rise that signals MH can happen at any time during a case — even in the PACU. Continuous electronic core temperature monitoring is essential to detect MH. You might use stick-on thermometers, but the overhead fluorescent lights in the OR can make for inaccurate readings. I rec- ommend using temperature probes for the tympanic membrane or esophagus — probes for bladder and rectal temps are effective, too — for any procedures that use general anesthetics and last longer than 30 minutes. Charles B. Watson, MD, FCCM Bridgeport (Conn.) Hospital cbwmdct@aol.com Monitor Core Temps to Detect the Onset of MH • ON THE RISE Probes for the tympanic membrane or esophagus (shown) can detect a malignant hyperthermia-related rise in the patient's core temperature. Pamela Bevelhymer, RN, BSN

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