Outpatient Surgery Magazine

Queasy Feeling - April 2017 - Subscribe to Outpatient Surgery Magazine

Outpatient Surgery Magazine, providing current information on Surgical Services, Surgical Facility Administration, Outpatient Surgery News and Trends, OR Excellence and more.

Issue link: http://magazine.outpatientsurgery.net/i/809919

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1 0 4 • O U T PA T I E N T S U R G E R Y M A G A Z I N E • A P R I L 2 0 1 7 W hat do cooks, woodwork- ers and cataract surgeons have in common? They all do better when they have lots of working space. Inadequate pupillary dila- tion occurs only in a small percentage of patients, but when it hap- pens, it's important to have a solution at the ready. Fortunately, sur- geons and surgery facilities have more mechanical and pharmaceuti- cal options than ever. Here's a review. Mechanical devices Along with the traditional iris hooks, a growing number of ring-type devices are now available, promising greater efficiency and ease of use and low trauma to the iris. All of the rings are effective, says T. Hunter Newsom, MD, founder of the Newsom Eye & Laser Center in Tampa, Fla. "The good news is that we have several different options that doctors can play with and see which fits well with their practice technique," he says. And, he adds, since companies with newer options are looking to get a foothold, they're usually happy to provide samples. Your Options for Managing Small Pupils The list of devices and drugs for pupillary dilation and maintenance is growing. Jim Burger Senior Editor • SMALL CHALLENGE Surgeons can call on a widening variety of devices to deal with stubbornly narrow pupils.

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