Outpatient Surgery Magazine

Heavy Duty - October 2016 - Subscribe to Outpatient Surgery Magazine

Outpatient Surgery Magazine, providing current information on Surgical Services, Surgical Facility Administration, Outpatient Surgery News and Trends, OR Excellence and more.

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1 2 • O U T PA T I E N T S U R G E R Y M A G A Z I N E • O C T O B E R 2 0 1 6 w Re: "Don't Flip Your Lid Over Surgeons in Skullcaps" (September, page 4). I personal- ly hate the bouffant hats, but am willing to listen to evi- dence-based medicine — but let's see it. Can you identify any literature that demon- strates that the average male surgeon, with no facial hair, short sideburns and reason- ably cut hair, has a higher infection rate because he's wearing a skullcap? Someone's opinion about what might be true should not be the basis for new standards. That is not the scientific way. Surgeons must operate for up to 8 to 12 hours in some cases. Temperature and comfort are significant factors that let them do so. At our ASC, where 5 male plastic surgeons who wear skullcaps per- form more than 3,800 operations a year, our infection rate is less than 0.5%. Richard J. Greco, MD The Georgia Institute For Plastic Surgery Savannah, Ga. plastxdoc@aol.com Letters & E-mail Talk back or sound off at letters@outpatientsurgery.net There is plenty of evidence for and against skullcaps, but it does not matter, if your policy doesn't allow them. We all have to follow the rules. Readers in a Flap Over Surgeons in Skullcaps

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