Outpatient Surgery Magazine

OR Excellence Awards 2016 - September 2016 - Subscribe to Outpatient Surgery Magazine

Outpatient Surgery Magazine, providing current information on Surgical Services, Surgical Facility Administration, Outpatient Surgery News and Trends, OR Excellence and more.

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geons still use conventional diamond blades, they have started transitioning to safety scalpels for other eyelid and corneal transplant procedures after a staff member was cut while cleaning up a case. Seeing the risks in real life hastened the transition, she says. Ms. Radke's center uses safe- ty scalpels and needles for cataract procedures. After the surgeon is finished with the diamond knife, he covers the blade with the safety shield and safely passes it off to the surgical tech. She says that getting surgeons to make the switch was relatively simple once she explained the risks to the surgeons. "We just told them that they had to use it for the benefit of our staff," says Ms. Radke. "They're very conscientious about sharps injuries, and whatever we need them to do to keep everyone safe, they go along with." On the safe side While cataract surgery is already one of the safest procedures, you want to do all you can to ensure that your patients have excellent outcomes with no complications. Incorporating these 8 advances is a good place to start. OSM 1 0 6 • O U T PA T I E N T S U R G E R Y M A G A Z I N E • S E P T E M B E R 2 0 1 6 • DRUG DECISIONS If a patient's pupil won't dilate after using drops, try pharmaceu- tical intracameral injection maintenance systems. Pamela Bevelhymer, RN, BSN

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