Outpatient Surgery Magazine

The Trouble With Transvaginal Mesh - August 2016 - Subscribe to Outpatient Surgery Magazine

Outpatient Surgery Magazine, providing current information on Surgical Services, Surgical Facility Administration, Outpatient Surgery News and Trends, OR Excellence and more.

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1 2 • O U T PA T I E N T S U R G E R Y M A G A Z I N E • M A Y 2 0 1 6 T o prevent a cataract patient from moving his head during sur- gery, you can either secure it with tape or have a staff member hold it steady. But tape leaves a sticky residue and it's uncom- fortable to hold someone's head. A better option: this vinyl-covered foam headrest that one of our nurses designed. Take a block of soft foam and cut a space out in the center where the patient can lay his head. Cut one side higher than the other. Position the low-cut side toward the surgeon, so he has access to the patient's eye. The high-cut side prevents the patient from moving his head away from the surgeon. Cover the headrest in vinyl, so it's easy to clean between cases. The patent-pending positioning device works so well in our busy eye center that we hardly ever use tape any- more. Homemade Headrest Keeps Cataract Patients Still Ideas Work P r a c t i c a l p e a r l s f r o m y o u r c o l l e a g u e s That Aggie Roland, RN • STAY STILL This foam headrest prevents patients from moving their heads during ophthalmic surgery. Aggie Roland, RN Aker Kasten Eye Center Boca Raton, Fla. aroland@akerkasten.com

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