Outpatient Surgery Magazine - Subscribers

The Future of Knee Repair - February 2016 - Outpatient Surgery Magazine

Outpatient Surgery Magazine, providing current information on Surgical Services, Surgical Facility Administration, Outpatient Surgery News and Trends, OR Excellence and more.

Issue link: http://magazine.outpatientsurgery.net/i/636774

Contents of this Issue

Navigation

Page 18 of 164

F E B R U A R Y 2 0 1 6 • O U T PA T I E N TS U R G E R Y. N E T • 1 9 W hen possible, why not let patients comfortably position themselves before inducing general anesthesia? They'll be better off, and so will the staff members who don't have to lift and position patients who may weigh upwards of 250 pounds. With shoulder surgeries, we administer the interscalene nerve block in the OR with the patient sitting on the captain's chair or lying lateral- ly on a bean bag. Since the patient is still awake, I can then ask and make sure he is completely comfortable. Then, without moving the patient, I induce general anesthesia with an LMA or an endotracheal tube (depending on the anesthesiologist's preference). This approach saves staff members from potential back and spine injuries, and saves patients from the discomfort they often later feel in other parts of their bodies as a result of their having been moved and placed in an unnatural position. Gil Samson, MD Winthrop-University Hospital Ambulatory Surgery Center Garden City, N.Y. chpetepa@optononlline.com • REDUCED RISK Patients who position themselves are less likely to have pain after surgery. Let Patients Comfortably Position Themselves Sarah Egan, RN

Articles in this issue

Links on this page

Archives of this issue

view archives of Outpatient Surgery Magazine - Subscribers - The Future of Knee Repair - February 2016 - Outpatient Surgery Magazine