Outpatient Surgery Magazine

Manager's Guide to Surgery's Ambulatory Anesthesia - July 2015

Outpatient Surgery Magazine, providing current information on Surgical Services, Surgical Facility Administration, Outpatient Surgery News and Trends, OR Excellence and more.

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5 0 S U P P L E M E N T T O O U T P A T I E N T S U R G E R Y M A G A Z I N E J U LY 2 0 1 5 tee of 600 ml of volume, the ventilator can determine the safest way to hit both of the those targets while limiting excessive breaths. In turn, this allows for a safer, more even and reliable distribution of gas throughout the patient's lungs. Ventilation has gone through other changes as well. Instead of a pneumatic bellows system (think of an accordion), some machines now use a finely tuned piston that cuts medical gas use. An even more recent update has transformed that large piston into a quarter-sized turbine that spins ultra-rapidly to push gas into the lung. Additionally, modern machines also come with many support modes to accommodate older, sicker and heavier patients, or patients who are breathing on their own. OSM Dr. Olympio (molympio@wakehealth.edu) is an anesthesiol- ogist at Wake Forest Baptist Medical Center and a professor of anesthesiology at Wake Forest School of Medicine.

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