Outpatient Surgery Magazine - Subscribers

Difficult Airways - April 2015 - Outpatient Surgery Magazine

Outpatient Surgery Magazine, providing current information on Surgical Services, Surgical Facility Administration, Outpatient Surgery News and Trends, OR Excellence and more.

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1 4 O U T P A T I E N T S U R G E R Y M A G A Z I N E O N L I N E | A P R I L 2 0 1 5 P r a c t i c a l p e a r l s f r o m y o u r c o l l e a g u e s I D E A S T H A T W O R K P U R P L E H A Z E Why Would You Swirl a Marker Into a Clear Liquid? W hen we have more than one clear liquid on the sterile field, including one that's not to be injected — usually a topical of some sort — we eliminate any possibility of a mix-up by swirling a surgical marker in the non-injectable fluid. That turns it purple and eliminates any potential confusion. An example: a nasal spray like Afrin, which is used during ear, nose, and throat sur- gery to improve visualization of the airway and to minimize post-oper- ative bleeding. Theda Kontis, MD, FACS Facial Plastic Surgicenter tckontis@aol.com Baltimore, Md. z TO DYE FOR No one is going to accidentally inject purple fluid — in this case Afrin. Theda Kontis, MD, FACS Editor's Note A few caveats with this tip: • AORN says to label all solutions on the sterile field. • Surgical site markers are intended for use on skin only. • Although the solution is not being injected, it — and the marker dye — could come in contact with a patient's mucous membranes.

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