Outpatient Surgery Magazine

No More Never Events - February 2014 - Subscribe to Outpatient Surgery Magazine

Outpatient Surgery Magazine, providing current information on Surgical Services, Surgical Facility Administration, Outpatient Surgery News and Trends, OR Excellence and more.

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1 4 O U T P AT I E N T S U R G E R Y M A G A Z I N E O N L I N E | F E B R U A R Y 2 0 1 4 IDEAS That Work C ataract extractions usual- ly involve covering the patient with a full-length drape that exposes only the operative eye. These cases are often performed under IV seda- tion, which obligates us anesthe- sia providers to closely monitor respiratory status. Nowadays, we often use capnography and measure the end-tidal CO 2 via a specialized nasal cannula. But the patient's exhaled CO 2 tends to accumulate under the surgi- cal drape. This accumulation can result in "re-breathing" and inaccurate CO 2 readings, espe- cially inhaled CO 2 readings, on the capnograph. This inhaled level of CO 2 is often above the limit set on most gas monitors and can cause alarms to sound repeatedly. I came up with an easy way to eliminate accumulated CO 2 under the surgical drape: • Connect a suction tubing to continuous low suction. • Clip it to the patient's gown in the chest area. • To prevent occlusion, place a small paper or plastic cup on the end of the tubing. Charles A. DeFrancesco, MD Delmont Surgery Center SUCTION OUT CO 2 The suction setup that will end up under the cataract patient's drape and remove the accumulated CO 2 . CATARACTS + CAPNOGRAPHY Avoid Inaccurate CO 2 Capnography Readings Greensburg, Pa. napman@comcast.net OSE_1402_part1_Layout 1 2/6/14 2:46 PM Page 14

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