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Melt Your Job Stress Away - January 2014 - Outpatient Surgery Magazine

Outpatient Surgery Magazine, providing current information on Surgical Services, Surgical Facility Administration, Outpatient Surgery News and Trends, OR Excellence and more.

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Page 58 H Y P O T H E R M I A asked them to check all that they used). In order, our respondents prefer forced-air warming systems (83.8%), cotton blankets pre-warmed with blanket warmers (76.8%), warming gowns (23.2%), underbody warming mattresses (7.1%), radiant warming devices (6.1%) and thermal body wraps (2.0%). Charlene Goff, RN, director of Warming as a comfort measure is still recommended during shorter procedures. nursing at the Pasadena (Calif.) Plastic Surgery Center, matches the warming device to the case. She says short cases are good with pre-warmed cotton blankets and longer cases do better with forced-air systems. She'll also deploy the forced-air warmer if a patient asks for more than 2 blankets. The efforts are well worth it, she says. "Patient satisfaction has increased 50% and length of recovery has been reduced," says Ms. Goff. "It's easier to get patients up and moving when they're warm and comfortable." Patti Lynn Trapp, RN, director of operative services at Avera St. Mary's Hospital in Pierre, S.D., heartily endorses her fluid-warming device, which she was introduced to, she says, after she'd been using the warming gown and the forced-air warming blanket. "It's very inexpensive, easy to use and efficient," she says of the IV fluid warmer. "We're now using it more often. Patients are warm, but not sweaty." OSM E-mail doconnor@outpatientsurgery.net.

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