Outpatient Surgery Magazine

Special Edition: Pain Management - March 2021 - Subscribe to Outpatient Surgery Magazine

Outpatient Surgery Magazine, providing current information on Surgical Services, Surgical Facility Administration, Outpatient Surgery News and Trends, OR Excellence and more.

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S urgical incisions create openings and opportunities for the trillions of bac- terial cells that live inside of the body, so efforts to prevent post-op infections shouldn't end until wounds are properly cleaned, closed and covered. Depending on the type of incision, surgeons can opt for any of the tried-and-true closing methods — sutures, staples, skin adhesives, hybrid devices and Steri-Strips. Regardless of the method they choose, preventing surgical site infections (SSIs) must be priority number one. Important last step One key to preventing SSIs is a tightly layered wound closure that doesn't leave open areas below the skin surface that can turn into abscesses and, eventually, infections. Surgeons performing a layered closure deep inside the body almost always use sutures, accord- ing to Matthew Regulski, DPM, a foot and ankle sur- geon and medical director at the Wound Care Institute of Ocean County in Toms River, N.J. Dr. Regulski says surgeons often use nonabsorbable sutures when securing structures that they want to 1 4 • S U P P L E M E N T T O O U T P A T I E N T S U R G E R Y M A G A Z I N E • M A R C H 2 0 2 1 Renee Cocchi | Contributing Editor Keys for Infection-Free Wound Care Preventing SSIs and keeping scarring to a minimum are important aspects of proper patient care. SCAR TISSUE Tight wound closure techniques prevent infection and produce very little scarring, which is the outcome patients most desire.

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