Outpatient Surgery Magazine

Special Edition: Staff & Patient Safety - October 2020 - Subscribe to Outpatient Surgery Magazine

Outpatient Surgery Magazine, providing current information on Surgical Services, Surgical Facility Administration, Outpatient Surgery News and Trends, OR Excellence and more.

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W rong-site surgeries occur approxi- mately 40 times a week in facili- ties across the U.S. Surgical pro- fessionals must therefore ask themselves why these avoidable errors continue to be an issue despite increased efforts to correct the problem, and what can be done to limit or prevent them from happening. A major issue is that there is no single root cause of wrong-site surgery. However, the Joint Commission has noticed common themes during reviews of incidents, including communication errors, hand-off errors, confirmation bias and con- sent that is either unclear, illegible or not specific enough. For instance, cases where the correct side or site isn't noted in pre-op paperwork. One of the most effective ways to eliminate wrong-site surgery is to follow the long-standing Universal Protocol, which addresses proven methods to ensure surgeons make the correct cut during every case. Make sure the three primary components of the Universal Protocol are in place at your facility. • Establish a verification process. Providers need to understand that each step within the Universal Protocol is crucial in preventing wrong- site surgery. Through the targeted solutions tools that The Joint Commission developed, we closely looked at wrong-site surgeries and found that the O C T O B E R 2 0 2 0 • O U T P A T I E N T S U R G E R Y . N E T • 11 Edward Pollak, MD | Oakbrook Terrace, Ill. Keys to Site-Marking Success Consistent protocols and a transparent work environment will prevent wrong-site surgeries at your facility. SIGN YOUR SITE Patient safety experts recommend surgeons mark only the correct surgical site — not where they shouldn't cut. Pamela Bevelhymer, RN, BSN, CNOR

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