Outpatient Surgery Magazine

Special Edition: Anesthesia - July 2020 - Subscribe to Outpatient Surgery Magazine

Outpatient Surgery Magazine, providing current information on Surgical Services, Surgical Facility Administration, Outpatient Surgery News and Trends, OR Excellence and more.

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wide. If the mandibular opening is less than three finger breadths, there won't be a lot of room to insert and maneuver airway instru- ments. Additionally, providers could have difficulty establishing the airway in patients who can't bring their lower teeth in front of their top teeth, lack adequate mandibular extension or have limited neck mobility. • Voice recognition. Nodules, cysts or polyps can cause unforeseen obstructions after the patient is sedated and tissue around the pharyn- geal airway relaxes. These internal structures are impossible to identify before surgery without direct visualization. But a hoarse voice could serve as a warning sign. A higher percentage of patients are presenting for outpatient sur- gery with comorbidities, obesity and sleep apnea, factors that increase the complexity of managing the airway. Pre-op screenings can help providers anticipate tricky intubations, but uncertainty always remains about which patients will pose a challenge. "Anesthesia professionals never approach intubations with confidence that they'll be successful," says Dr. Aziz. "They must always have a back-up plan in place for what they'll do when faced with a difficult airway." OSM 2 8 • O U T P A T I E N T S U R G E R Y M A G A Z I N E • J U L Y 2 0 2 0

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