Outpatient Surgery Magazine

Special Edition: Anesthesia - July 2020 - Subscribe to Outpatient Surgery Magazine

Outpatient Surgery Magazine, providing current information on Surgical Services, Surgical Facility Administration, Outpatient Surgery News and Trends, OR Excellence and more.

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2 2 • O U T P A T I E N T S U R G E R Y M A G A Z I N E • J U L Y 2 0 2 0 T here's arguably no more dan- gerous task in surgery during the coronavirus pandemic than intubat- ing patients. Anesthesia professionals work inch- es from the airway, in the direct path of aerosolized virus parti- cles, as they attempt to insert a laryngoscope blade while decked out in gloves, gowns, N95 masks and face shields. "COVID-19 has complicated airway management," says Michael Aziz, MD, a professor of anesthesiology and medicine at Oregon Health & Science University in Portland. "Providers must protect themselves with several layers of PPE, which makes the job more physically demanding. Communication is hampered and visualization is more difficult." The coronavirus outbreak serves as a reset for anesthesia, according to Roxanne McMurray, DNP, APRN, CRNA, a clinical assistant profes- sor at the University of Minnesota School of Nursing. "Providers must be more vigilant when securing the airway," she says. "The current challenges will force us to up our game, and that's a good thing." Dan Cook | Editor-in-Chief New Thinking in Airway Management The coronavirus outbreak could change how providers approach difficult intubations. SAFE DISTANCE Video laryngoscopes let anesthesia providers intubate patients without standing directly over the airway.

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