Outpatient Surgery Magazine - Subscribers

Back To Work - June 2020 - Outpatient Surgery Magazine

Outpatient Surgery Magazine, providing current information on Surgical Services, Surgical Facility Administration, Outpatient Surgery News and Trends, OR Excellence and more.

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the same for the whole decade. Why? It could be that they focus on sharps safety from the outset of their training, and receive reinforce- ment throughout their careers. In the OR, handling sharps is the bulk of what they do, every single day. We hypothesized their injury rate was so low because they're very familiar with proper sharps handling practices, and they reinforce those skills daily while learning to screen multiple requests and ignore distractions more effectively. Close the threat window If you're still having too many sharps injuries — even though you've educated and trained your staff, and given them safer products to use — my advice is to take a fresh look and focus on distractions in your ORs and minimize interruptions when possible during wound closure. We found that reducing sharps injuries isn't just about training, com- prehension, understanding, awareness and skill-building. It's also about familiarity with the OR environment and helping people pay attention to what they need to do in the moment, while screening out irrelevant noise of many types. Ultimately, it's about mindfulness. OSM 7 6 • O U T P A T I E N T S U R G E R Y M A G A Z I N E • J U N E 2 0 2 0 Dr. DiTullio (bditulli@bidmc.harvard.edu) is senior clinical operations liaison of perioperative services at Beth Israel Deaconess Medical Center in Boston.

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