Outpatient Surgery Magazine - Subscribers

No More Empty Beds - Outpatient Surgery Magazine - February 2020

Outpatient Surgery Magazine, providing current information on Surgical Services, Surgical Facility Administration, Outpatient Surgery News and Trends, OR Excellence and more.

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floor-based lifts is being recognized. Ms. Boynton says lower- tech limb holders, while effective, are so heavy that just getting them in and out of the OR presents an injury risk of their own. Lifts in the OR assist with limb prep, limb hold- ing and patient trans- fers. Ceiling-mounted OR lifts are even bet- ter — floor-mounted lifts can present a tripping hazard and are struc- tures that need to be worked around — and being installed in an increasing number of facilities. Radiation safety The Joint Commission is putting a heightened focus on annual inspec- tions of radiation safety items: lead aprons, drapes, and skirts; safety glasses; and mobile barriers, according to Mike Bohan, radiation safe- ty officer at Yale New Haven Hospitals in Connecticut. "To make sure all the equipment is safe, inspect them visually and tactilely once a year," he says. Flatten the aprons, drapes and skirts out on a table and inspect the seams to make sure they're tight. Look to see that there are no tears on the outer surfaces and run your hands over the items to make sure the lead inside isn't lumping. Make sure the Velcro straps are in good working order. Glasses, overhead glass shields and F E B R U A R Y 2 0 2 0 • O U T PA T I E N T S U R G E R Y. N E T • 9 7 • WORK ZONE Cords, tubing and fluids combine to increase risks of trips, slips and falls in a busy operating room.

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