Outpatient Surgery Magazine

Special Edition: Surgical Construction - February 2020 - Subscribe to Outpatient Surgery Magazine

Outpatient Surgery Magazine, providing current information on Surgical Services, Surgical Facility Administration, Outpatient Surgery News and Trends, OR Excellence and more.

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of the microscopes that lets him move the microscope as needed for his specific cases. • Space and flow. Having ORs that are sufficient in size is important in any facility. One thing that is different about ENT compared with other surgical disciplines is that a large number of the procedures per- formed are done bilaterally. This, along with considering the ideal locations of the anesthesia machine and other equipment, factored into how much space was needed in our ORs (about 400 square feet each). We studied the flow of patients, equipment, instruments and sup- plies into and out of the ORs, and decided to design two doors in each room. The patient goes into and comes out of the OR through one door. At the conclusion of the cases, and after the patient is out of the room, staff remove soiled instruments and dirty items through that same door. Sterilized items are brought into the ORs through the sec- ond door, which is connected to the sterile storage area. It's a very good flow. • Sterile fields. Maintaining positive air pressure in the ORs is imperative. Our MEP added a sensitive detection system to the ORs to ensure the air pressure is properly maintained. Once we started oper- ating in the center, the staff quickly discovered an alarm would sound if the OR door was held open for more than 15 seconds. At first, the alarm was annoying (although very useful). However, it quickly changed our behavior. Staff no longer hold OR doors open. • Outside opinions. During the planning phase, we visited another ENT-only surgery center to see how they were set up and how they operated day to day. This was very helpful because it helped us to think about some useful design elements we'd overlooked to that point. • Keeping tabs. During construction, the entire design "dream team" 5 2 • O U T PA T I E N T S U R G E R Y M A G A Z I N E • F E B R U A R Y 2 0 2 0

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