Outpatient Surgery Magazine

Special Edition: Surgical Construction - February 2020 - Subscribe to Outpatient Surgery Magazine

Outpatient Surgery Magazine, providing current information on Surgical Services, Surgical Facility Administration, Outpatient Surgery News and Trends, OR Excellence and more.

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Having surgeons participate in the early planning phase of the facili- ty was critical because they know what works and what doesn't in other facilities in which they operate. They understand the signifi- cance of things like which way a door opens and where the "hand wave" automatic door-opening pad should be positioned much better than people do. At the beginning of 2018, our team started meeting on a regular basis. We knew we wanted two ORs, six pre-op bays, six PACU bays, six stepdown recovery bays and an ample storage area. During the design phase, we decided to cut back to three stepdown bays to ensure there was plenty of storage space in the perioperative area. Knowing a large percentage of our patients would be children also factored heavily in some of our design decisions. We created a kid- friendly space for children to wait with their parents before going into the OR. We also created space for a slushie machine in PACU for the post-tonsil and adenoidectomy kids. • Capital purchases. The expertise of MEP engineers was of para- mount importance for ensuring the electrical design is sufficient to meet the facility's current and future power demands. This meant we had to identify very early on the makes and models of all the large equipment — OR lights, microscopes, image guidance platforms, anesthesia machines and sterilizers — we intended to purchase. We invested in two video towers for endoscopic sinus surgery and one image guidance/navigation system. The image guidance equip- ment is on a rolling cart, so it can be moved between ORs. Surgical microscopes are critical for ENT procedures and our doc- tors knew exactly which type they wanted. We bought one new micro- scope and one refurbished unit from a local vendor. One of our doc- tors is a neurotologist who performs a lot of tympanoplasties and mastoidectomies. We were able to purchase a different head for one 5 0 • O U T PA T I E N T S U R G E R Y M A G A Z I N E • F E B R U A R Y 2 0 2 0

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