Outpatient Surgery Magazine

Special Edition: Opioids - January 2020 - Subscribe to Outpatient Surgery Magazine

Outpatient Surgery Magazine, providing current information on Surgical Services, Surgical Facility Administration, Outpatient Surgery News and Trends, OR Excellence and more.

Issue link: http://magazine.outpatientsurgery.net/i/1198986

Contents of this Issue

Navigation

Page 18 of 58

©2019 Pacira BioSciences, Inc. Parsippany, NJ 07054 PP-EX-US-5079 07/19 Choose EXPAREL in the ASC: A proven, long-lasting, non-opioid alternative that improves recovery Please refer to brief summary of full Prescribing Information on adjacent page. Full Prescribing Information is available at www.EXPAREL.com. For more information, please visit www.EXPAREL.com or call 1-855-RX-EXPAREL (793-9727). References: 1. Joshi GP, Ogunnaike BO. Consequences of inadequate postoperative pain relief and chronic persistent postoperative pain. Anesthesiol Clin North Am. 2005;23(1):21-36. 2. Fox JP, Vashi AA, Ross JS, Gross CP. Hospital-based, acute care after ambulatory surgery center discharge. Surgery. 2014;155(5):743-753. 3. Mont MA, Beaver WB, Dysart SH, Barrington JW, Del Gaizo DJ. Local infiltration analgesia with liposomal bupivacaine improves pain scores and reduces opioid use after total knee arthroplasty: results of a randomized controlled trial. J Arthroplasty. 2018;33(1):90-96. 4. Yu S, Dundon J, Solovyova O, Bosco J, Iorio R. Can multimodal pain management in TKA eliminate patient- controlled analgesia and femoral nerve blocks? Clin Orthop Relat Res. 2018;476(1):101-109. Indication EXPAREL is indicated for single-dose infiltration in adults to produce postsurgical local analgesia and as an interscalene brachial plexus nerve block to produce postsurgical regional analgesia. Safety and efficacy have not been established in other nerve blocks. Important Safety Information EXPAREL is contraindicated in obstetrical paracervical block anesthesia. Adverse reactions reported with an incidence greater than or equal to 10% following EXPAREL administration via infiltration were nausea, constipation, and vomiting; adverse reactions reported with an incidence greater than or equal to 10% following EXPAREL administration via interscalene brachial plexus nerve block were nausea, pyrexia, and constipation. If EXPAREL and other non-bupivacaine local anesthetics, including lidocaine, are administered at the same site, there may be an immediate release of bupivacaine from EXPAREL. Therefore, EXPAREL may be administered to the same site 20 minutes after injecting lidocaine. EXPAREL is not recommended to be used in the following patient population: patients <18 years old and/or pregnant patients. Because amide-type local anesthetics, such as bupivacaine, are metabolized by the liver, EXPAREL should be used cautiously in patients with hepatic disease. Warnings and Precautions Specific to EXPAREL: Avoid additional use of local anesthetics within 96 hours following administration of EXPAREL. EXPAREL is not recommended for the following types or routes of administration: epidural, intrathecal, regional nerve blocks other than interscalene brachial plexus nerve block, or intravascular or intra-articular use. The potential sensory and/or motor loss with EXPAREL is temporary and varies in degree and duration depending on the site of injection and dosage administered and may last for up to 5 days, as seen in clinical trials. Warnings and Precautions for Bupivacaine-Containing Products Central Nervous System (CNS) Reactions: There have been reports of adverse neurologic reactions with the use of local anesthetics. These include persistent anesthesia and paresthesia. CNS reactions are characterized by excitation and/or depression. Cardiovascular System Reactions: Toxic blood concentrations depress cardiac conductivity and excitability which may lead to dysrhythmias, sometimes leading to death. Allergic Reactions: Allergic-type reactions (eg, anaphylaxis and angioedema) are rare and may occur as a result of hypersensitivity to the local anesthetic or to other formulation ingredients. Chondrolysis: There have been reports of chondrolysis (mostly in the shoulder joint) following intra-articular infusion of local anesthetics, which is an unapproved use. Methemoglobinemia: Cases of methemoglobinemia have been reported with local anesthetic use. • Pain is the most common cause of PACU delays and the second most common reason for hospital-based acute care admission after discharge from an ASC 1,2 Enables faster achievement of recovery milestones 4 Reduces or eliminates opioid use 3* EXPAREL provides long-lasting pain control 3 AND… *The clinical benefit of the decrease in opioid consumption was not demonstrated in the pivotal trials. ASC, ambulatory surgery center; PACU, post-anesthesia care unit. Scan me for ASC outcomes data

Articles in this issue

Links on this page

Archives of this issue

view archives of Outpatient Surgery Magazine - Special Edition: Opioids - January 2020 - Subscribe to Outpatient Surgery Magazine