Outpatient Surgery Magazine

Snuffing Out Surgical Smoke - December 2019 - Subscribe to Outpatient Surgery Magazine

Outpatient Surgery Magazine, providing current information on Surgical Services, Surgical Facility Administration, Outpatient Surgery News and Trends, OR Excellence and more.

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D E C E M B E R 2 0 1 9 • O U T PA T I E N T S U R G E R Y. N E T • 5 1 S kin prep- ping is serious business at our facility. So serious, in fact, that the staff who prep patients before surgery wear different colored gowns than the rest of the OR team. The designated pink gowns — a visual signal to everyone in the OR that nurses and doctors in pink are performing a critical process and are not a member of the sterile field — are a part of our standardized skin prep protocol that we rolled out in 2017. Like all changes, it hasn't always been easy to convince staff the extra steps — not to mention attire — were necessary. But with patience and persistence, we've managed to ingrain these critical safety standards into the collective psyche of our staff. Here's how we made proper skin prep a top priority, and how you can do the same. 1. Preppers wear pink gowns. Like the bulk of our protocols, we started wearing designated prep gowns as a direct result of AORN's skin antisepsis guidelines, which require the person doing the Prepped to Perfection How we made proper skin prepping a top priority. Mary Wilson, BSN, RN, CNOR | Morgantown, W.Va. • SEEING PINK Circulators wear designated pink gowns to let others in the OR know they're prepping a patient. Brittany Harvey, MBA, MSN, RN

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