Outpatient Surgery Magazine

Her Loss, Their Gain - October 2019 - Subscribe to Outpatient Surgery Magazine

Outpatient Surgery Magazine, providing current information on Surgical Services, Surgical Facility Administration, Outpatient Surgery News and Trends, OR Excellence and more.

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2 6 • O U T PA T I E N T S U R G E R Y M A G A Z I N E • O C T O B E R 2 0 1 9 T he essential elements of proper endo- scope care begin well before the notoriously difficult-to-clean devices are ready for high-level disinfection. The following proto- cols that we estab- lished for transporting scopes from bedside to the reprocessing room and back again will lower cross-infection risks and eliminate all doubts about whether a scope is clean or dirty. Easy identification Let's begin with a clean scope leaving the decontamination area. Have staff lock the transport container with green clips and attach a green "Clean" sticker on the outside. If you have the capability, tag each container with a unique ID that can be scanned into an instru- ment-tracking database. Our scopes are equipped not only with a real- time location system (RTLS) that lets us track location, but also a unique radio frequency information device (RFID) that tracks that the validated cleaning process has occurred. Note on the outside of the transport container the type of scope 1 Focus On Flexible Endoscope Care Our standardized process for handling and transporting scopes maintains high-level disinfection standards. Infection Prevention Diane Betti, RN, MSN, CNOR, CSPDT, ST and Michael Gudejko, BS • LET IT ROLL Baystate Medical Center SPD coordinator Kim Smith pushes a case cart with transport containers for clean scopes on top.

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