Outpatient Surgery Magazine

Special Outpatient Surgery Edition - Anesthesia - July 2019

Outpatient Surgery Magazine, providing current information on Surgical Services, Surgical Facility Administration, Outpatient Surgery News and Trends, OR Excellence and more.

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5 8 • O U T PA T I E N T S U R G E R Y M A G A Z I N E • J U L Y 2 0 1 9 T he refractive eye procedure was sched- uled to begin in about 20 minutes, just enough time for the sedative effects of the sublingual tablets to take effect. Michael Greenwood, MD, looked on as a nurse opened a two-pack of tablets. Things got a little hazy after that. "I vaguely recall someone in the OR telling a joke and another person in the room saying the procedure went perfectly," remem- bers Dr. Greenwood, an ophthalmic surgeon at Vance Thompson Vision in Fargo, N.D. Dr. Greenwood was the one sitting in the stretcher chair, not stand- ing next to it, when the nurse slid 2 tablets under his tongue. The tablets slowly dissolved, sending a steady stream of the sedative mida- zolam, the analgesic ketamine and the antiemetic ondansetron into his bloodstream. The worry of surgery slipped away in minutes, and he soon become blissfully unaware of his surroundings. Should You Go IV-Free? Oral sedation promises to improve efficiencies and increase patient satisfaction in busy eye centers. • GOOD BEGINNING Patients appreciate avoiding IV starts, perhaps the most stress-inducing part of surgery. Michael Greenwood, MD Daniel Cook | Executive Editor

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